Patriotic Picks: July 2019

Whether it’s via their tone, topic, or tenor, certain works just say “America.” Here are three such titles, suggested by David Bruce Smith, founder of the Grateful American Foundation, in partnership with the Washington Independent Review of Books.

Patriotic Picks: July 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. This story of the ragamuffin Huck’s journey down the Mississippi River offers an often coarse, scathing commentary on racism and 19th-century societal norms.
  • A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith. Childhood in circa-1912, working-class Williamsburg is captured through the eyes of Francie Nolan, a young girl whose eccentric New York family is, by turns, scandalous, loving, erratic, and jubilant.
  • The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway. An elderly Cuban fisherman battles a massive marlin — and, ultimately, himself — in this classic man-versus-nature tale spun in a spare, beautiful style.

 

See more Patriot Picks >>

 

 

Patriotic Picks: July 2019

Patriotic Picks: July 2019

Whether it’s via their tone, topic, or tenor, certain works just say “America.” Here are three such titles, suggested by David Bruce Smith, founder of the Grateful American Foundation, in partnership with the Washington Independent Review of Books.

Patriotic Picks: July 2019

 

  • Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain. This story of the ragamuffin Huck’s journey down the Mississippi River offers an often coarse, scathing commentary on racism and 19th-century societal norms.
  • A Tree Grows in Brooklyn by Betty Smith. Childhood in circa-1912, working-class Williamsburg is captured through the eyes of Francie Nolan, a young girl whose eccentric New York family is, by turns, scandalous, loving, erratic, and jubilant.
  • The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway. An elderly Cuban fisherman battles a massive marlin — and, ultimately, himself — in this classic man-versus-nature tale spun in a spare, beautiful style.

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History MattersJuly 15 to July 31, 2019

In 1750, the Spanish missionary, Father Junipero Serra, started a historic trek through Mexico, and north into what is now California, eventually establishing missions that became settlements, then towns, and–ultimately cities. On July 16, 1769, Serra and his party of explorers arrived in what is now San Diego. In all, the missionary founded nine cities in California stretching from San Diego to San Francisco.

For more information, the Grateful American Book Prize recommends Stowaway to California! Adventures with Father Junipero Serra by Natalie Nelson Hernandez.

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History MattersJuly 15 to July 31, 2019The story goes that abolitionists Lucretia Mott and Elizabeth Cady Stanton attended the 1840 World Anti-Slavery Convention in London. Because they were women, they were barred from full participation. This is said to have prompted Mott and Stanton to birth America’s women’s rights movement. Eight years later, on July 19, 1848 they were joined by approximately 200 like-minded women at the first women’s rights conference in Seneca Falls, NY. Stanton opened the event with a Declaration of Sentiments and Grievances, which stated: “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men and women are created equal…”

Recommended reading about the women’s right movement: Until We Win by Linda Newbery.

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History MattersJuly 15 to July 31, 2019Where were you when America made history in outer space with the launch of Apollo 11, the first U.S. space ship to reach the moon? If you are a parent or grandparent, you probably stayed close by the television set, fascinated and can remember why this historical event aroused an educational curiosity. On board were Edwin ‘Buzz’ Aldrin, Michael Collins and mission commander Neil Armstrong, who was the first human to set foot on the moon on July 20, 1969 and say: “That’s one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.”

Get kids hooked on the story of Apollo 11 with Moonshot: The Flight of Apollo 11 by Brian Floca.

 

 


July 13 to July 31 — History Matters is a biweekly feature courtesy of The Grateful American Book Prize.

History MattersJuly 1 to July 15, 2019

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was arguably the most comprehensive civil rights law ever passed in the United States.History MattersJuly 1 to July 15, 2019  It was proposed by President John F. Kennedy in 1963 and passed by his successor, President Lyndon B. Johnson, on July 2, 1964, seven months and 10 days after President Kennedy was assassinated.  The law prohibited segregation—based on race–in schools and public places, and it made employment discrimination illegal.

For more information, the Grateful American Book Prize recommends The Civil Rights Act of 1964: An End to Racial Segregation by Judy L Hasday.
 

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History MattersJuly 1 to July 15, 2019The Fourth of July is one of the most highly anticipated holidays of the year.  History MattersJuly 1 to July 15, 2019 It’s a day for picnics, barbecues and fireworks.  But it has a more significant meaning.  It is when we celebrate — and remember —  America’s hard-won independence from British rule.

Recommended reading: The Declaration by Gemma Malley.

 

 

 

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History MattersJuly 1 to July 15, 2019Hamilton, one of Broadway’s most popular offerings, has appealed to people of all ages. History MattersJuly 1 to July 15, 2019It almost guarantees an interest in learning more about the man and his times. He was killed on July 14, 1804 in a duel with his long-time political rival, Aaron Burr. Their complicated history is worth knowing.

The Grateful American Book Prize suggests that Judith St. George’s book, The Duel: The Parallel Lives of Alexander Hamilton and Aaron Burr, is an attractive way to teach your kids a lesson.

 
 
 


 

July 1 to July 15 — History Matters is a biweekly feature courtesy of The Grateful American Book Prize.

 

History MattersJune 18 to June 30, 2019

On June 18, 1812, the United States Congress voted to declare war on Great Britain. History MattersJune 18 to June 30, 2019Although America had won its independence from their rule less than 30 years earlier, this time, the cause was to stand up for our fledgling nation’s rights on the high seas. It was an audacious challenge, considering that Great Britain was arguably the greatest naval power in the world. Yet, a year and a half later, the war was over, and the Treaty of Ghent was signed in Belgium on December 24, 1814. As a matter of pride, many in the U.S. began referring to the conflict as “the second war of independence.”

For more information, The Grateful American Book Prize recommends What Caused the War of 1812? by Sally Senzell Isaacs.

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History MattersJune 18 to June 30, 2019The 1960s was a decade of great change in the U.S.  History MattersJune 18 to June 30, 2019It was the end of the beginning of the struggle for equal rights — for all.  Volunteers from across America got involved in the crusade for civil rights. Some died for the cause, including three young activists, Andrew Goodman, James Chaney and Michael Schwerner; they disappeared in Neshoba County, Mississippi. on June 21, 1964, but their bodies were not discovered until August 4th. Mississippi was then a heavily segregated state. The U.S Justice Department indicted 19 men on December 4th for violating the civil rights of Schwerner, Goodman, and Chaney.

For more information, read The Freedom Summer Murders by Don Mitchell.

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History MattersJune 18 to June 30, 2019When General George Armstrong Custer led 250History MattersJune 18 to June 30, 2019 cavalrymen against a Sioux Indian force of approximately two to four thousand encamped near the Little Bighorn River in Montana on June 25, 1876, it became an event that has been retold through the generations. Custer and almost all of his troops were massacred; only one scout survived. But, it was the Indians who lost the most. The outrage over the humiliating defeat ramped up the government’s rage to drive the Native Americans off of their lands.

Custer’s famous–or infamous–defeat at Little Bighorn is a true story about America’s westward expansion. Young learners will benefit from a better understanding of this important event by reading CUSTER’S LAST STAND by Quentin Reynolds.

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History MattersJune 18 to June 30, 2019America’s electorate got younger on June 30, 1971.  History MattersJune 18 to June 30, 2019The ratification of the 26th Amendment to the Constitution lowered the voting age in all elections from 21 to 18, and 11 million people were added to the eligible constituency.

Knowing the power of the ballot box teaches kids to become responsible, civically minded adults. The Grateful American Book Prize recommends Amendment XXVI: Lowering the Voting Age by Sylvia Engdahl.

 

 


June 18 to  June 30, 2019 — History Matters is a biweekly feature courtesy of The Grateful American Book Prize.

 

Patriotic Picks: June 2019

Whether it’s via their tone, topic, or tenor, certain works just say “America.” Here are three such titles, suggested by David Bruce Smith, founder of the Grateful American Foundation, in partnership with the Washington Independent Review of Books.

Patriotic Picks: June 2019

 

  • Obscure Destinies by Willa Cather. The Great Plains serve as the harshly beautiful backdrop for this trio of novellas about sacrifice, pride, love, and the endurance of the human spirit.
  • Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes. A 14-year-old boy ends up with a front-row seat to the Boston Tea Party, the first shots of the Revolutionary War, and other pivotal events from our nation’s birth.
  • The Good Times by Russell Baker. In this entertaining memoir, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author recalls his often absurd (and absurdly funny) days working his way up the rungs of the newspaper ladder.

See more Patriot Picks >>

Patriotic Picks: June 2019

Whether it’s via their tone, topic, or tenor, certain works just say “America.” Here are three such titles, suggested by David Bruce Smith, founder of the Grateful American Foundation, in partnership with the Washington Independent Review of Books.

Patriotic Picks: June 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Obscure Destinies by Willa Cather. The Great Plains serve as the harshly beautiful backdrop for this trio of novellas about sacrifice, pride, love, and the endurance of the human spirit.
  • Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes. A 14-year-old boy ends up with a front-row seat to the Boston Tea Party, the first shots of the Revolutionary War, and other pivotal events from our nation’s birth.
  • The Good Times by Russell Baker. In this entertaining memoir, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author recalls his often absurd (and absurdly funny) days working his way up the rungs of the newspaper ladder.

See more Patriot Picks >>

 

 

Patriotic Picks: June 2019