“CALL FOR ARTISTS” FOR ROCK HALL MURAL PROJECT

The Main Street Rock Hall Steering Committee is seeking experienced, qualified mural artists to develop and implement a public art project in Rock Hall, MD. The purpose of the project is to re-envision, re-design and recreate three deteriorating murals in downtown Rock Hall while eliciting input and participation from both local school children and community members.

Themes for the murals will be:
1) the lives and traditions of Chesapeake Bay watermen
2) the lives and traditions of Eastern Shore farmers
3) the bountiful natural resources of the Chesapeake Bay, from plants to fish to crustaceans.


“CALL FOR ARTISTS” FOR ROCK HALL MURAL PROJECT

Applications are due no later than midnight Friday, February 1, 2019. A committee of judges selected by Main Street Rock Hall will evaluate all submissions and choose the winning artist(s). The project will begin in February, with a completion date of June 7, 2019 for final execution of mural painting.

Interested applicants may apply on-line via www.kentcountyartscouncil.org . Please be sure to read all guidelines before applying. If unable to apply on-line, please contact Laurie Walters at 443-465-0681 for additional information.

The Main Street Rock Hall Steering Committee thanks the following patrons and supporters of “The Murals of Rock Hall”: Bayside Foods (Debbie, Jeff and Andrew Carroll), Dowlings’s Painting (Sam Dowling), Java Rock (Joanne and Jim Rich), Kent County Arts Council, The Mainstay, The Maryland Dept. of Housing and Community Development, The Maryland State Arts Council and Sherwin Williams (Greg Krafchik).

If you would like to add your support to this exciting community project, please contact Laurie Walters via email or 443-465-0681.

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“CALL FOR ARTISTS” FOR ROCK HALL MURAL PROJECT

 

Movie of the Month: HOW TO STEAL A MILLION

Charles Bonnett is a veteran art forger, who sells his phony masterpieces for a large profit. When one of his sculptures gets into a Parisian museum, his daughter steals it to protect his reputation; starring Audrey Hepburn, Peter O’Toole, Eli Wallach, and Charles Boyer.

Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Bruce Cole

Bruce Cole, who passed away in January 2018, is most often remembered for his outstanding leadership at the National Endowment for the Humanities. Beyond that, he was a significant visionary scholar and professor who brought light into the humanities and arts. This podcast shares the highlights of a conversation between three leaders in higher education who knew Bruce, well.

Special guest, Mona Charon, senior fellow at the Ethics and Public Policy Center, was joined by David Bruce Smith, president, Grateful American Foundation, and Michael Poliakoff, president of the American Council of Trustees and Alumni (ACTA).

Grateful American Book Prize Judges to begin accepting submissions for the 2019 Prize after January 1

WASHINGTON, DC, Dec 20 — Submissions for the 2019 Grateful American Book Prize will be accepted after the first of the year. The award is presented annually for works of fiction and nonfiction that accurately illuminate the events and personalities of American history for 11-15-year olds. Books published between July 1, 2018 and July 31, 2019 are eligible.

The winner receives $13,000–in commemoration of the 13 original Colonies–a distinctive medallion created by American artist Clarice Smith, and a lifetime pass to the New-York Historical Society. Two additional authors get “Honorable Mentions,” the medallion, and $500 each.

Education advocate, author and publisher David Brice Smith co-founded the Prize in 2015 along with the late Dr. Bruce Cole, a former chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

“Our goal was to encourage new and established authors–and their publishers–to produce more books that stimulate a love of history. Knowledge about the past helps teenagers to grow into civically minded, responsible citizens,” says Smith.

In addition to Smith, the Panel of Judges includes Dr. Cole’s widow, Doreen Cole, former assistant to the Dean, Honors College, Indiana University; Dr. Louise Mirrer, President and CEO, New-York Historical Society; Dr. Peter S. Carmichael, Robert C. Fluhrer Professor of Civil War Studies & Director of the Civil War Institute, Gettysburg College; Dr. Neme Alperstein, a teacher of Gifted and Talented Students in the New York City Public School System; Dr. Douglas Bradburn, author, historian;  President and Chief Executive Officer of George Washington’s Mount Vernon; and John Danielson, Chairman of the Board of Directors at Education Management Corporation.

L.M. Elliott received the 2018 Prize for her historical novel, Suspect Red, a re-examination of McCarthyism and the Red Scare, published by Hyperion-Disney. Ms. Elliott also earned an “Honorable Mention” for her Hamilton and Peggy! A Revolutionary Friendship, published by HarperCollins and Katherine Tegen Books.

Teri Kanefield picked up an “Honorable Mention” for her biography of Andrew Jackson. Ms. Kanefield is the author of The Making of America series published by Harry N. Abrams.

NOTE TO EDITORS: Books for adolescents—ages 11 through 15– about important events and people in America’s history, are eligible; historical fiction or non-fiction. We are looking for excellence in writing and storytelling.

  • Books published between July 1, 2018 and July 31, 2019 are eligible. 
  • Books cannot be self-published.
  • Writing style has to appeal to learners in grades seven through nine.
  • Books can include illustrations that appeal to children and reflect the highest standards of artistic creativity.
  • Books must be historically accurate. Non-fiction works must describe events and individuals in a manner that is well researched and documented. Fictional stories must authentically convey the times in which they are meant to occur.

Patriotic Picks: December 2018

Whether it’s via their tone, topic, or tenor, certain works just say “America.” Here are three such titles, suggested by David Bruce Smith, founder of the Grateful American Foundation, in partnership with the Washington Independent Review of Books.

  • I Never Promised You a Rose Garden by Joanne Greenberg. A 16-year-old girl enters a mental hospital to conquer her schizophrenia in a 1964 novel called “convincing and emotionally gripping” by the New York Times.
  • The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton. Gilded-Age Manhattan serves as both a rarefied playground and an emotional prison for its moneyed, hollow inhabitants, chief among them Lily Bart.
  • Like a River: A Civil War Novel by Kathy Cannon Wiechman. Two teens — one an underage boy, the other a girl in disguise — fight for the Union and their own futures in this visceral tale written for middle-grade readers.

Patriotic Picks: December 2018

Patriotic Picks: December 2018

Whether it’s via their tone, topic, or tenor, certain works just say “America.” Here are three such titles, suggested by David Bruce Smith, founder of the Grateful American Foundation, in partnership with the Washington Independent Review of Books.

  • I Never Promised You a Rose Garden by Joanne Greenberg. A 16-year-old girl enters a mental hospital to conquer her schizophrenia in a 1964 novel called “convincing and emotionally gripping” by the New York Times.
  • The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton. Gilded-Age Manhattan serves as both a rarefied playground and an emotional prison for its moneyed, hollow inhabitants, chief among them Lily Bart.
  • Like a River: A Civil War Novel by Kathy Cannon Wiechman. Two teens — one an underage boy, the other a girl in disguise — fight for the Union and their own futures in this visceral tale written for middle-grade readers.

Patriotic Picks: December 2018

Patriotic Picks: December 2018

Patriotic Picks: December 2018

Whether it’s via their tone, topic, or tenor, certain works just say “America.” Here are three such titles, suggested by David Bruce Smith, founder of the Grateful American Foundation, in partnership with the Washington Independent Review of Books.

  • I Never Promised You a Rose Garden by Joanne Greenberg. A 16-year-old girl enters a mental hospital to conquer her schizophrenia in a 1964 novel called “convincing and emotionally gripping” by the New York Times.
  • The House of Mirth by Edith Wharton. Gilded-Age Manhattan serves as both a rarefied playground and an emotional prison for its moneyed, hollow inhabitants, chief among them Lily Bart.
  • Like a River: A Civil War Novel by Kathy Cannon Wiechman. Two teens — one an underage boy, the other a girl in disguise — fight for the Union and their own futures in this visceral tale written for middle-grade readers.

Patriotic Picks: December 2018

Patriotic Picks: December 2018