A Look Inside The Launch of Our Leather Woven Collection

November has been a really exciting month for Smilow. One of the highlights has been launching our entire woven leather collection with our New York showroom Suite NY. What started with a lounge and paired ottoman, which we reissued in 2013, has turned into re-issues of our dining chair with and without arms, a brand new woven leather bench, and two stools—one backed and one without—at two heights. Take a look at the journey from vintage inspiration, to production, to our launch and party.

A Look Inside The Launch of Our Leather Woven Collection

 

New York Spaces’ Q&A with Judy Smilow of Smilow Design

Judy Smilow, of midcentury-inspired furniture company Smilow Furniture, answers New York Spaces’ questions on the brand’s timeless pieces and where they are carried now.

NYS: Tell us about Smilow Furniture. What are you known for?

Judy Smilow: Smilow® Furniture continues a legacy started by my father Mel Smilow, of producing fine and timeless designs for modern homes. My dad (1922–2002) designed and retailed modern furnishings through his six independently-owned stores from 1949 through the late 1970s. He was a champion of affordable, finely crafted, modern furnishings and his work has been recognized and coveted by collectors and well appreciated by his loyal customers for over 50 years. In 2013, it was with great privilege, love, and pride that we relaunched the brand. Continuing on as a family-owned business (now also joined by my daughter), we reintroduced a collection of these beautiful, enduring, modern design for a new generation of customers.

Since 2013 we have continued to expand the offerings and our new Woven Leather collection is the latest example. These authentic American-crafted midcentury designs, continue to stand the test of time.

Read the Entire New York Spaces Q&A >>

 

New York Spaces’ Q&A with Judy Smilow of Smilow Design

Judy Smilow, of midcentury-inspired furniture company Smilow Furniture, answers New York Spaces’ questions on the brand’s timeless pieces and where they are carried now.

NYS: Tell us about Smilow Furniture. What are you known for?

Judy Smilow: Smilow® Furniture continues a legacy started by my father Mel Smilow, of producing fine and timeless designs for modern homes. My dad (1922–2002) designed and retailed modern furnishings through his six independently-owned stores from 1949 through the late 1970s. He was a champion of affordable, finely crafted, modern furnishings and his work has been recognized and coveted by collectors and well appreciated by his loyal customers for over 50 years. In 2013, it was with great privilege, love, and pride that we relaunched the brand. Continuing on as a family-owned business (now also joined by my daughter), we reintroduced a collection of these beautiful, enduring, modern design for a new generation of customers.

Since 2013 we have continued to expand the offerings and our new Woven Leather collection is the latest example. These authentic American-crafted midcentury designs, continue to stand the test of time.

Read the Entire New York Spaces Q&A >>

 

HOLIDAY READING RECOMMENDATIONS FOR KIDS

1. Madeleine L’Engle’s A WRINKLE IN TIME

2. Madeleine L’ Engle’s AND BOTH WERE YOUNG

3. Judith Guest’s ORDINARY PEOPLE

4. J. D. Salinger’s THE CATCHER IN THE RYE

5. Betty Smith’s A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN

6. Kathy Cannon Wiechman’s LIKE A RIVER

7. Chris Stevenson’s THE DRUM OF DESTINY

8. Laura Amy Schlitz’s THE HIRED GIRL

9. Michaela MacColl’s and Rosemary Nichols’s FREEDOM’S PRICE

10. S. E. Hinton’s THE OUTSIDERS

11. Joanne Greenberg’s I NEVER PROMISED YOU A ROSE GARDEN

12. Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey’s A WOMAN OF INDEPENDENT MEANS

13. Anne Frank’s THE DIARY OF ANNE FRANK

14. Willa Cather’s MY ANTONIA

15. Mark Twain’s THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN

16. Elie Wiesel’s NIGHT

17. Rebecca Stead’s WHEN YOU REACH ME

18. Carson McCullers’s THE HEART IS A LONELY HUNTER

19. Ernest Hemingway’s THE SUN ALSO RISES

20. Ernest Hemingway’s A FAREWELL TO ARMS

21. Louise Fitzhugh’s HARRIET THE SPY

22. Harper Lee’s TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

23. Judy Blume’s FOREVER…

24. Esther Forbes’s JOHNNY TREMAIN

HOLIDAY READING RECOMMENDATIONS FOR KIDS

December 2016 Book Recommendations

Erich Segal’s, LOVE STORY; Very young, potent love; very young potent death.

Tom Wolfe’s, THE BONFIRE OF THE VANITIES; the collision of snobbish Wall Street with the backstreet of the Bronx.

Jean Craighead George, MY SIDE OF THE MOUNTAIN; Sam Gribley is an unhappy city boy who runs away to the mountains, learns to survive solitude, and thrive within the peculiarities of nature.

Nathaniel Hawthorne’s, THE SCARLET LETTER; the daring Hester Prynne has an affair, births a daughter, and manages their lives, despite a narrow minded society.

 

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SoCal in February

Just added to the calendar:

Saturday, February 25, 2017
The Coach House
33157 Camino Capistrano
San Juan Capistrano, CA 92675
1-949-496-8930

Visit the shows page for more information.

The 39 Steps at The Garfield Center for the Arts Dec 2 – 18, 2016

Closing the 2016 season, director Mark Sullivan will bring “The 39 Steps” to the Garfield stage Dec. 2 to 18. Written by Patrick Barlow, adapted from the novel by John Buchan, this comedic who-done-it is not to be confused with the 1935 Hitchcock thriller of the same name. This adaptation opened in London and promptly won the Lawrence Olivier Award for Best Comedy of 2007. More info and tickets >>

 

 

 

 

 

America is a very grateful nation and being grateful makes us better citizens

WASHINGTON, DC – As Thanksgiving Day approaches, it is interesting to note that America is a very grateful nation. In fact, the majority of Americans are particularly thankful for their families and the freedom they have living in the U.S., according to a recent survey sponsored by the John Templeton Foundation.

Meanwhile, studies by the Pew Research Center rank America as perhaps the most optimistic of nations. One report notes that: “When asked, on a scale of 0 to 10, about how important working hard is to getting ahead in life, 73% of Americans said it is was a ‘10’ or ‘very important,’ compared with a global median of 50% among the 44 nations.”

It is that work ethic that caused the 19th century philosopher Alexis de Tocqueville to describe the United States as “exceptional.” de Tocqueville wrote and published the book, Democracy in America, in 1835 after an extended trip to America during which he met and had discussions with city and country folks. He wanted to know what made our country so different in a world ruled by aristocracies.

Perhaps it was our nation’s diversity, our long-held belief that an educated nation is a strong nation, and a “tradition that nourished a spirit of liberty,” as one student of de Tocqueville’s opus described it. Indeed, the Templeton poll acknowledged that at the top of the list of things for which we are grateful, is family. But respondents in the poll ranked freedom a pretty close second, says David Bruce Smith, co-founder of the Grateful American Book Prize.

Smith believes that gratitude makes us better citizens and it’s why he and former Chairman of the National Endowment for the Humanities, Bruce Cole, founded the Prize to begin with.

“It’s not enough to be optimistic if we are to be better citizens. We need to be enthusiastic as well. Nothing makes us as exhilarated about our future as knowledge about our past. Our aim with the Prize is to encourage authors and publishers to produce more works of historically accurate fiction and nonfiction, books that can engage our children in stories about how our nation came to be. We want the history teachers in our schools to have all the tools they can use to get their students to understand that the origins of America—its history— tell a unique story that textbooks cannot describe. If our nation’s history could inspire de Tocqueville, it certainly can inspire young learners,” says Smith.

Thanksgiving day is upon us, which means the Christmas shopping season is about to begin. Smith believes there is no better gift you can give your children than a good, appealing read such as those submitted each year by authors seeking the Prize. He particularly recommends the books that have won the Grateful American Book Prize —so far. Kathy Cannon Wiechman’s, Like a River (2015), and Chris Stevenson’s, The Drum of Destiny (2016).

“Like a River is a page-turner about the plight of a pair of teens caught up in the conflict between the states. Stevenson drew directly from the published memoir of John Greenwood who, in 1775, volunteered to fight for his country at the age of 16,” says Smith.