Books for Mother’s Day 2016

Nancy Friday’s, MY MOTHER/MY SELF
Herman Wouk’s, MARJORIE MORNINGSTAR
Anne Tyler’s, BACK WHEN WE WERE GROWNUPS

Erich Segal’s, LOVE STORY
Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey’s, A WOMAN OF INDEPENDENCE
Elizabeth Forsythe Hailey’s, HOME FREE

Vivian Gornick’s, FIERCE ATTACHMENTS
Erica Jong’s, FEAR OF FIFTY
Madeleine L’Engle’s, TWO-PART INVENTION: THE STORY OF A MARRIAGE

Faye Moskowitz’s, A LEAK IN THE HEART
Maya Angelou’s, THE HEART OF A WOMAN
Golda Meir’s, MY LIFE
Phyllis Rose’s, PARALLEL LIVES

Books for Mother’s Day 2016

Black Men: Student Presentations on Contemporary Images

Every Picture Tells a Story – Lecture and Gallery Walk – Saturday, April 30 at 10 a.m.

Washington College students and associate professor of English Alisha Knight invite the public to Sumner Hall to consider contemporary stereotypes of black men and how literature and images either undermine or perpetuate those stereotypes. This event is free and open to the public.

Knight will give a mini-lecture to provide background about the most pervasive stereotypes of black men. The gallery walk will follow and continue until noon.
More Info >>

Sumner Hall (G.A.R. Post #25), 206 S. Queen Street, Chestertown.

Historical Imagination

The founding of the Grateful American Book Prize was featured in the April 2016 Issue of Philanthropy Roundtable Magazine.

Historical Imagination

David Bruce Smith was listening to a radio story about a group hoping to build a Museum of the American Revolution in Philadelphia. (His ears perked up because the group was a tenant of ­the company his late father Robert Smith built into one of the major real-estate developers in D.C.) A national survey conducted by the museum backers found that 83 percent of Americans failed a basic test of knowledge on the Revolution and America’s founding documents.

Smith was surprised that an American ­Revolution museum didn’t already exist. (The campaign then launching was eventually successful, and the museum will open in 2017.) And he was irked that so many citizens were ­ignorant of their national story.

Smith had been drawn to history since childhood, prompted in part by his father’s keen interest in preserving and restoring properties like ­Washington’s Mount Vernon, Madison’s ­Montpelier, the Benjamin Franklin House in London, and Abraham Lincoln’s summer cottage. “My father always referred to himself as a grateful American,” explains Smith. So in 2013 “I started the Grateful American Foundation with the purpose of restoring enthusiasm for ­American history among kids and adults.”

He began with a series of podcasts featuring historical experts, curators, and educators. Former chairman of the National Endowment of the Arts Bruce Cole encouraged Smith to add a book prize to his efforts. He now offers a cash reward of $13,000 (to represent the 13 colonies) to authors who write compelling books bringing America’s story (in fiction or non-fiction form) to middle-schoolers. “Of the 85 prizes given to children’s literature,” notes Smith, “it is the only one on that topic.”

The prize was first offered in 2015, and Smith was told that if he received 30 to 50 submissions to launch, it would be a success. He received 140. The winner, Like a River, follows two teenage Union soldiers through the Civil War in detailed historical fiction, including photography. The foundation is now seeking submissions for the 2016 prize. “I’ve committed to five years,” says Smith, “but really and truly I would say the prize will be available indefinitely, because it’s important.”

Learn more in the April Issue of Philanthropy Roundtable.

Schedule update

Sorry folks but the following shows have been cancelled:

* Jul 28: Brighton Bar, Long Branch, NJ
* Jul 29: Highline Ballroom, New York, NY

Please contact the venue or ticket seller for refund information.

May 2016 Book Recommendations

Barbara Walters’, HOW TO TALK WITH PRACTICALLY ANYBODY ABOUT PRACTICALLY ANYTHING; the art of the interview from the woman who scooped all of the important ones.

Elizabeth Taylor’s, MRS. PALFREY AT THE CLAREMONT; an elegant widow moves into a dingy hotel of mostly seniors, and befriends a young, handsome writer.

Louise Shivers’s, HERE TO GET MY BABY OUT OF JAIL; lust, love and — a murder — in 1937 North Carolina.

Margaret Truman’s, BESS W. TRUMAN; a former First Daughter’s biography of her mother.

May Sarton’s, ENDGAME: A JOURNAL OF THE SEVENTY-NINTH YEAR; the poet, novelist and diarist continues to write prolifically despite serious illness.

 

May 2016 Book Recommendations

Jewish Lit Live Presents Roz Chast

The George Washington University Department of English and Jewish Lit Live proudly present a reading by Roz Chast on Thursday, April 28, 2016 at 7pm in GWU’s Funger Hall.

Roz Chast has loved cartooning since her childhood in Brooklyn. After graduating from the Rhode Island School of Design—with a degree in painting, because “it seemed more artistic”—she returned to cartooning, initially publishing in Christopher Street and The Village Voice. The New Yorker first accepted one of her cartoons in 1978, and she has worked with the magazine ever since. A prolific writer and illustrator, her books include The Party After You Left (2014), Theories of Everything: Selected, Collected, and Health-Inspired Cartoons (2008), and her most recent graphic novel, the Thurber Prize-nominated Can’t We Talk About Something More Pleasant? 

 

The New Yorker Video: At Home with Roz Chast

Jewish Lit Live hosts rising and renowned Jewish American writers to speak with the GW and literary community. Guest speakers have included emerging leaders, National Humanities Award Recipients, international bestsellers, and UN-Award Winning Writers, e.g. Michael Chabon, E.L. Doctorow, Nicole Krauss, & Erica Jong.

Jewish Literature Live is made possible by the generous support of David Bruce Smith, BA ’79, a former member of GW’s Board of Trustees and an alumnus of the English Department.

This event is free and open to the public. First come, first serve seating.
Funger Hall Address: 2201 G Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20052

2016 Jewish Lit Live! Authors

Jewish Lit Live Presents Roz Chast

Jewish Lit Live Presents Phyllis Rose

The George Washington University Department of English and Jewish Lit Live proudly present a reading by Phyllis Rose on Tuesday, April 19, 2016 in the Marvin Center.

Phyllis Rose is an essayist, literary critic, and professor. A naturally voracious reader and lover of literature, Phyllis Rose holds a B.A. from Radcliffe College, an M.A. from Yale University, and a Ph.D. from Harvard University. She has written many books, including Woman of Letters: A Life of Virginia Wolf (1978), Jazz Cleopatra: Josephine Baker in Her Time (1989), and The Year of Reading Proust: A Memoir in Real Time (1997). She will be reading from her most recent book, The Shelf: From LEQ to LES: Adventures in Extreme Reading.

Jewish Lit Live hosts rising and renowned Jewish American writers to speak with the GW and literary community. Guest speakers have included emerging leaders, National Humanities Award Recipients, international bestsellers, and UN-Award Winning Writers, e.g. Michael Chabon, E.L. Doctorow, Nicole Krauss, & Erica Jong.

Jewish Literature Live is made possible by the generous support of David Bruce Smith, BA ’79, a former member of GW’s Board of Trustees and an alumnus of the English Department.

This event is free and open to the public. First come, first serve seating. The Cloyd Heck Marvin Center (MC) Address: 800 21st Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20052

2016 Jewish Lit Live! Authors

Jewish Lit Live Presents Phyllis Rose

Florida in June & More CA dates

Look for us in Clearwater, FL, Santa Rosa, CA, and Tracy, CA later this year.

  • Jun 3: Capitol Theatre, Clearwater, FL
  • Jul 8: Rock Star University’s House of Rock, Santa Rosa, CA
  • Nov 18: Grand Theatre, Tracy, CA

Visit the shows page for links to buy tickets and for more information.