Sally Ride’s Story Debuts on Speakaboos

A unique interactive digital story inspired by Sally Ride, the first American female astronaut in space, is coming to Speakaboos on Monday, March 21, 2016. The story was created by Executive Producer David Bruce Smith and Producer Halim Jabbour.

The legendary American hero is celebrated in a newly animated story featuring a spirited and adventurous girl, Hayley, who dreams of becoming an astronaut like Sally Ride and exploring outer space. Young readers can be inspired by Hayley’s love of space as she prepares for her first mission, experiences weightlessness, and launches her first satellite into space.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Speakaboos is a digital storybook platform that motivates children to read, explore, and discover stories they love based on their interests. Its custom library is designed around high-interest categories that feature stories with rich illustrations, animated characters, and touchscreen interactions that bring favorite and new stories to life, support comprehension and keep children engaged while learning. Speakaboos is a multi-platform subscription service that delivers educational, entertaining, interactive stories to children. The digital library can be enjoyed on computers, tablets, or mobile devices at home, on the go, in schools, or in libraries.

Sally Ride’s Story Debuts on Speakaboos

March 2016 Book Recommendations

Maya Angelou’s, I KNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SINGS; From Southern racism and rape to independence and renown. Volume 1 of the writer’s memoirs.

Richard Zoglin’s, HOPE: ENTERTAINER OF THE CENTURY; the first comprehensive biography of the actor-entertainer.

Marja Mills’s, THE MOCKINGBIRD NEXT DOOR: LIFE WITH HARPER LEE; a journalist’s friendship with the reclusive author of “To Kill a Mockingbird.”

Joseph P. Lash’s, HELEN AND TEACHER: THE STORY OF HELEN KELLER AND ANNE SULLIVAN MACY; a revealing account about love, attachment, and independence.

March 2016 Book Recommendations

Jewish Lit Live Presents Judith Viorst

The George Washington University Department of English and Jewish Lit Live (JLL) proudly present a reading by Judith Viorst on Thursday, March 3, 2016 at 7:00PM in The GW Marvin Center Room 307.

Judith Viorst is an American writer and psychoanalyst. She has written over fifty books—both for adults and children—including Alexander and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day, Murdering Mr. Monti, and Imperfect Control. A DC native and recipient of the 2011 Foremother Award for Lifetime Achievement from the National Research Center for Women & Families, Viorst will be reading from her book Necessary Losses: The Loves, Illusions, Dependencies, and Impossible Expectations That All of Us Have to Give Up in Order to Grow. 

Jewish Lit Live hosts rising and renowned Jewish American writers to speak with the GW and literary community. Guest speakers have included emerging leaders, National Humanities Award Recipients, international bestsellers, and UN-Award Winning Writers, e.g. Michael Chabon, E.L. Doctorow, Nicole Krauss, & Erica Jong.

Jewish Literature Live is made possible by the generous support of David Bruce Smith, BA ’79, a former member of GW’s Board of Trustees and an alumnus of the English Department.

This event is free and open to the public. First come, first serve seating. The Cloyd Heck Marvin Center (MC) Address: 800 21st Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20052

2016 Jewish Lit Live! Authors

Jewish Lit Live Presents Judith Viorst

Dwell, Once Again – Reports on Smilow Furniture

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Dwell – which now has expanded beyond its print magazine — last week featured an extensive article about the history and re-introduction of Smilow Furniture, An Icon’s Legacy is Revived by a Father-Daughter Bond. Paige Alexus goes in depth about the steps it has taken to reissue the mid-century modern furniture line. We are thrilled by the extensive interview she conducted, the current and archival photographs, and the detailed account of how we were able to bring Mel Smilow’s original furniture designs back into production.

“…Because of one woman’s inspiring dedication to reviving her late father’s work, you can now own an exquisite masterpiece formed from original midcentury designs and produced with similar techniques in the same area where it all started. We feel that a story like this insists on being told by someone who’s been closely ingrained in its history, so we asked Judy Smilow herself to help us bring it to life.” …

Dwell has been vital in reporting on the revival of Smilow Furniture. Just after the initial ten-piece collection was reintroduced in May 2013, Dwell’s Nancy Frick Battaglia wrote Mid-Century Modern Designer Focus: Mel Smilow — American Individualist  – “An unsung mid-century designer is poised for a triumphant revival.”

We couldn’t be more thrilled by their admiration and support. And as an added bonus Dwell Store is now featuring the Smilow Furniture Rush Collection.

Dwell Reports on Smilow Furniture’s Reincarnation

Dwell Reports on Smilow Furniture’s Reincarnation

Dwell Reports on Smilow Furniture’s ReincarnationDwell – which has expanded beyond its print magazine — featured an extensive article about the history and re-introduction of Smilow Furniture, An Icon’s Legacy is Revived by a Father-Daughter Bond. Paige Alexus goes in depth about the steps it has taken to reissue the mid-century modern furniture line. We are thrilled by the extensive interview she conducted, the current and archival photographs, and the detailed account of how we were able to bring Mel Smilow’s original furniture designs back into production.

“…Because of one woman’s inspiring dedication to reviving her late father’s work, you can now own an exquisite masterpiece formed from original midcentury designs and produced with similar techniques in the same area where it all started. We feel that a story like this insists on being told by someone who’s been closely ingrained in its history, so we asked Judy Smilow herself to help us bring it to life.” …

Dwell has been vital in reporting on the revival of Smilow Furniture. Just after the initial ten-piece collection was reintroduced in May 2013, Dwell’s Nancy Frick Battaglia wrote Mid-Century Modern Designer Focus: Mel Smilow — American Individualist  – “An unsung mid-century designer is poised for a triumphant revival.”

We couldn’t be more thrilled by their admiration and support. And as an added bonus Dwell Store is now featuring the Smilow Furniture Rush Collection.

March Art Show: Paintings by Bill Lewis

It’s all in the story | Paintings by Bill Lewis

March 4 – March 25, 2016
Opening Reception – First Friday, March 4, 5-8 pm

Closing PartyFriday, March 25, 5-8 pm

Sumner Hall
206 South Queen Street
Chestertown, MD

Please join us on an inspiring visual journey through one man’s experience with brain cancer. All proceeds from this benefit show will go toward treatment.

Signed prints available.

March Art Show: Paintings by Bill Lewis

“The Mistrel” 36 x 48 Acrylic on Canvas

Jewish Lit Live Presents Aryeh Lev Stollman

The George Washington University Department of English and Jewish Lit Live (JLL) proudly present a reading by Aryeh Lev Stollman on Thursday, February 18, 2016 at 7:00PM in The GW Marvin Center Room 301.

Dr. Aryeh Lev Stollman is an American writer and neuroradiologist. He has published two novels—The Far Euphrates (1997) and The Illuminated Soul (2002)—and numerous short stories. Stollman will be reading from The Far Euphrates, which was an American Library Association Notable Book of 1997, a Los Angeles Times Book Review Recommended Book of the Year, and National Book Critics Circle Notable Book of 1997. He is currently working on his third novel.

Jewish Lit Live hosts rising and renowned Jewish American writers to speak with the GW and literary community. Guest speakers have included emerging leaders, National Humanities Award Recipients, international bestsellers, and UN-Award Winning Writers, e.g. Michael Chabon, E.L. Doctorow, Nicole Krauss, & Erica Jong.

Jewish Literature Live is made possible by the generous support of David Bruce Smith, BA ’79, a former member of GW’s Board of Trustees and an alumnus of the English Department.

This event is free and open to the public. First come, first serve seating. The Cloyd Heck Marvin Center (MC) Address: 800 21st Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20052

2016 Jewish Lit Live! Authors

Lani Seikaly Awarded 2015 KENNY Award

When the Hedgelawn Foundation and the Kent County Arts Council was tasked to identify the 2015 KENNY winner for an exceptional individual who has given “excellence and service in the arts in Kent County,” they didn’t need to look far to see that Lani Hall Seikaly would be the perfect 10th recipient of one of the County’s most prestigious awards.

A very special thanks to The Chestertown Spy for the article and video coverage of the event and to Steve Atkinson of Local in Kent County for wonderful photo coverage of the event.

Out-of-the-classroom ways to engage young learners

WASHINGTON, DC, Feb 10 – The new Broadway show, Hamilton, is a history lesson put to music and a “perfect example” of how teachers can use out-of-the-classroom resources to engage their students in school, according to award-winning educator Neme Alperstein.

Alperstein has nearly 30 years of teaching experience, and numerous honors for her work with gifted and talented students in New York City’s Public School system. She is also a staunch advocate of using extra-curricular activities to “fire up” young learners, particularly when it comes to putting history lessons into an absorbing context.

“What better example is there than the new Broadway show, Hamilton, written in rap and hip hop style? The story alone is compelling, and teachers who find an interesting story in any historical period can make history enchanting,” she says.

Few will dispute the notion that history lessons can be boring, particularly for middle school students. Nor will they disagree that history lessons are important.

“For young learners, history class should make them curious as to why an event or a personality from the past impacts their lives. A story of the past offers a context in which to place events of the present and future that illuminate and further understanding.”

Alperstein says a musical such as Hamilton is not the only means of motivating youngsters; teachers have numerous opportunities as well.

“The Library of Congress has a huge online presence with resources to support research with the touch of keyboard. The Teaching With Primary Sources Teachers Network is another excellent and free resource. In addition, art museums and local historical societies are also wonderful sources of historical context.”

One of the simplest and most immediate ways of getting the attention of students might be to assign the class to read “a good page-turner of a book,” a work of historically accurate fiction or nonfiction that can absorb him or her, according to Alperstein. She was recently selected to sit on the Panel of Judges for the 2016 Grateful American Book Prize, which encourages authors and publishers to produce such works for young learners.

“The Prize,” she explains, “is a powerful invitation for new and established authors to step back in time and relate with historical accuracy an adventure. Aspiring authors can reimagine the impact of events on characters through fictional accounts, or reveal new interpretations of history in nonfictional accounts. Meanwhile, historically accurate books can transport, enchant and uplift the reader— young learners in particular.”

The 2015 winner was Kathy Cannon Wiechman for Like a River: A Civil War Novel. It was described by Prize co-founder David Bruce Smith, who is also an author and publisher, as “an exemplar of what the award is all about, riveting books that rouse the emotions of young readers in a way that leaves them wanting to learn more about a critical era in the evolution of the country. It goes beyond the dry retelling of the Civil War that often puts students to sleep at their desks during history class.”