Smilow Design Featured in “Craftsmanship in Design” at WestEdge Design Fair

Smilow Design Featured in “Craftsmanship in Design” at WestEdge Design Fair

westedgedesignfairlogo_1100-2015

 

 

 

Design editor Michael Wollaeger moderates “Craftsmanship in Design” at the Westedge Design Fair on Thursday, October 22, 2015  from 4-5pm.

The panel includes Thomas Lavin, owner of the Thomas Lavin Showroom; artist and designer Kelly Lamb; Fuse Lighting principal Kevin Kolanowski; and Judy Smilow of Smilow Design. They will  discuss how independent designers are making a splash in the contemporary design marketplace with a renewed emphasis on fine craftsmanship.

WestEdge is a four-day event that offers the best in modern design, all in an environment designed to engage, entertain and inspire. The fair offers the opportunity to shop from premium home furnishings brands-many new to the West Coast and meet the designers behind thousands of inspiring products. In addition, attendees gain insight from leading names in the design industry with a full series of educational programs and special events.

 

 

Grateful American Book Prize Awarded to Kathy Cannon Wiechman for Like a River: A Civil War Novel

Like a River: A Civil War Novel, a work of historical fiction by Kathy Cannon Wiechman, has been selected to receive the 2015 Grateful American Book Prize.

David Bruce Smith, co-founder of the Prize, said that the Civil War novel was chosen by the award’s panel of judges because “it is an exemplar of what the Prize is all about—to encourage authors and publishers to produce fiction and nonfiction that accurately depict the past as a means of engaging young readers in American history. Like a River is a page-turner about the plights of a pair of teens—on the battlefield–caught up in the conflict between the states. To call it riveting is a disservice. The book rouses the emotions of its readers in a way that leaves them wanting to learn more about that critical era in the evolution of the country. It goes beyond the dry retelling of the Civil War that often puts students to sleep at their desks during history class.”

Author Wiechman promptly responded to the news, noting that it was her love – and her family’s love – of their American heritage that piqued her interest to write about, “My passion for US History came during my school years, not from history class, but from reading biographies and historical fiction, books that made history come alive.

When I write, my goal is to make history live and breathe for today’s readers the way itdoes for me. Having Like a River honored by this inaugural award gives me hope that I can accomplish that goal,” she said.

Wiechman pointed out that her “love of country was instilled in me at a young age by my parents. My father, who proudly served in the US Army Air Corps, flew the American flag in the front yard every day. My immigrant mother reminded me often that I was fortunate to have been born an American, and daily news adds exclamation points to her words. My parents would be enormously proud.”

The Prize, which will be presented to the author at an October 22 reception at President Lincoln’s Cottage in Washington, comes with a cash award of $13,000 representing the original 13 colonies. In addition, Wiechman will receive a medal created for the occasion by Mr. Smith’s mother, the noted artist Clarice Smith.

Two additional authors and their books will also be acknowledged at the event with Honorable Mention Certificates, Darlene Beck Jacobson’s novel, Wheels of Change, which confronts Washington DC’s racial turbulence during Theodore Roosevelt’s presidency, and Michaela MacColl’s, The Revelation of Louisa May, a deftly appealing combination of actual events and history culled from the life of Louisa May Alcott.

Carolyn Yoder, Wiechman’s editor at Calkins Creek, an imprint of Highlights, had this to say about Like a River: “(Kathy’s) words have the power to transport—taking readers deep inside nineteenth-century America when the country was torn apart by civil war.

With a distinct southern voice that can move swiftly and slowly, like a river, Kathy is dedicated and passionate about creating an accurate and emotional—and most important, relatable—portrait of the past for young readers. Leander and Paul are real teenagers with joys and pains and desires. The world of Like of River is not dry and

In addition to David Bruce Smith, the panel of judges for the Prize included co-founder Dr. Bruce Cole, the former chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities, Dr. Rod Paige, former U.S. Secretary of Education, Dr. Louise Mirrer, President and CEO, New-York Historical Society, Dr. Douglas Bradburn, author, historian and Founding Director of the Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon, and John Danielson, founder of Chartwell Education Group and former Chief of Staff at the U.S. Department of Education.

Grateful American Book Prize Awarded to Kathy Cannon Wiechman for Like a River: A Civil War Novel

Grateful American™ Book Prize will be awarded to author Kathy Cannon Wiechman for Like a River: A Civil War Novel

WASHINGTON, DC, Sep 24 – Like a River: A Civil War Novel, a work of historical fiction by Kathy Cannon Wiechman, has been selected to receive the 2015 Grateful American Book Prize, it was announced here today.

David Bruce Smith, co-founder of the Prize, said that the Civil War novel was chosen by the award’s panel of judges because “it is an exemplar of what the Prize is all about—to encourage authors and publishers to produce fiction and nonfiction that accurately depict the past as a means of engaging young readers in American history. Like a River is a page-turner about the plights of a pair of teens—on the battlefield—caught up in the conflict between the states. To call it riveting is a disservice. The book rouses the emotions of its readers in a way that leaves them wanting to learn more about that critical era in the evolution of the country. It goes beyond the dry retelling of the Civil War that often puts students to sleep at their desks during history class.”

Author Wiechman promptly responded to the news, noting that it was her love – and her family’s love – of their American heritage that piqued her interest to write about American history.

“My passion for US History came during my school years, not from history class, but from reading biographies and historical fiction, books that made history come alive. When I write, my goal is to make history live and breathe for today’s readers the way it does for me. Having Like a River honored by this inaugural award gives me hope that I can accomplish that goal,” she said.

Wiechman pointed out that her “love of country was instilled in me at a young age by my parents. My father, who proudly served in the US Army Air Corps, flew the American flag in the front yard every day. My immigrant mother reminded me often that I was fortunate to have been born an American, and daily news adds exclamation points to her words. My parents would be enormously proud.”

The Prize, which will be presented to the author at an October 22 reception at President Lincoln’s Cottage in Washington, comes with a cash award of $13,000 representing the original 13 colonies. In addition, Wiechman will receive a medal created for the occasion by Mr. Smith’s mother, the noted artist Clarice Smith.

Two additional authors and their books will also be acknowledged at the event with Honorable Mention Certificates, Darlene Beck Jacobson’s novel, Wheels of Change, which confronts Washington DC’s racial turbulence during Theodore Roosevelt’s presidency, and Michaela MacColl’s, The Revelation of Louisa May, a deftly appealing combination of actual events and history culled from the life of Louisa May Alcott.

Carolyn Yoder, Wiechman’s editor at Calkins Creek, an imprint of Highlights, had this to say about Like a River: “(Kathy’s) words have the power to transport—taking readers deep inside nineteenth-century America when the country was torn apart by civil war. With a distinct southern voice that can move swiftly and slowly, like a river, Kathy is dedicated and passionate about creating an accurate and emotional—and most important, relatable—portrait of the past for young readers. Leander and Paul are real teenagers with joys and pains and desires. The world of Like of River is not dry and distant but vividly alive.”

In addition to David Bruce Smith, the panel of judges for the Prize included co-founder Dr. Bruce Cole, the former chair of the National Endowment for the Humanities, Dr. Rod Paige, former U.S. Secretary of Education, Dr. Louise Mirrer, President and CEO, New-York Historical Society, Dr. Douglas Bradburn, author, historian and Founding Director of the Fred W. Smith National Library for the Study of George Washington at Mount Vernon, and John Danielson, founder of Chartwell Education Group and former Chief of Staff at the U.S. Department of Education.

Smilow Design: 2015 Martha Stewart American Made Audience Choice Finalist

Smilow Design: 2015 Martha Stewart American Made Audience Choice Finalist

Smilow Design: 2015 Martha Stewart American Made Audience Choice FinalistWe’re a FINALIST! Now it’s time to cast your VOTE.

Smilow Design has just been selected by Martha Stewart and her panel of judges as a finalist in the 2015 Martha Stewart American Made Audience Choice Awards in the Design category.

Martha Stewart’s American Made is a nationally recognized awards program that celebrates new rising stars of the growing nationwide maker community who have turned their passions for handcrafted, well-designed goods into small businesses and proudly make their products in America.

Please VOTE for Smilow Design. You can cast your vote for your favorite American maker. One Audience Choice Winner will be announced on October 23, 2015.

Annual Rock Hall FallFest Saturday, October 10, 2015

Kent County Arts Council is a proud sponsor of the 18th Annual Rock Hall FallFest
A Celebration of Family, Community and Oysters!
Saturday, October 10th, 2015
10am – 4pm, Rain or Shine!

A wonderful mix of music which has made this Rock Hall Festival a toe-tappin, hip swingin’ , up-front-and- personal family festival, on Main Street in Rock Hall.

Two stages, one at each end of Main, will give you choices, and as you stroll, don’t miss the street musicians up and down the street! All the daytime music is FREE!

 

Annual Rock Hall FallFest Saturday, October 10, 2015On Main Street

  • 50 Craft booths
  • 2 stages with music all day
  • with The Catonsville HS Steel Band
  • Food, food, food
  • Kids Kourt in Rock Hall Village for youngsters

Music Highlights 2015

  • The High & Wides 11 am (Mainstay Stage)
  • The Obsoleets 11:15 am (Bayside -Rt 20 & Main St- Stage)
  • The Obsoleets 12:15 pm (Mainstay Stage)
  • Catonsville High School Steel Band 12:15 pm (Bayside Stage)
  • Sombarkin 1:15 pm (Mainstay Stage)
  • Mulebone 1:30 pm (Bayside Stage)
  • Main Street Parade with the Dixie Power Trio 2:15 pm (Main Street)
  • Dixie Power Trio 2:30 pm (Bayside Stage)
  • Vic Vacuum & the Attachments 2:30 pm (Mainstay Stage)
  • Brothers All-Star Review with the Clean Sweep Horns 3:15 pm Mainstay Stage
    (This schedule is subject to change)

Movement seeks to engage students in history

Kids tend to do a lot of yawning in history class; a good read can inspire them.

A new movement to engage America’s students in the study of history is underway.  It’s led by a dedicated education advocate, David Bruce Smith, who admits that he and his team have a daunting task.

“Kids tend to do a lot of yawning in history class. Just look at the findings of the Department of Education’s National Assessment of Educational Progress [NAEP]. Their newest study revealed that fewer than half of our twelfth-grade students have a basic proficiency in U.S. history. Among fourth-graders, it’s less than a third,” said Smith, who is also an established author and publisher.

NAEP surveys have been administered since 1969 and have consistently revealed an “alarming” deficiency among students in their knowledge of U.S. history. Smith said that without an understanding of how and why America came to be and who were the important personalities who shaped the past, they won’t fully grasp what is required to become civically responsible citizens.

“That’s why I co-founded the Grateful American Book Prize.  It is an effort to get kids curious about history and to give them the power they need to realize that the past is prologue to the future.  While textbooks may provide the details, works of fiction and nonfiction based on fact provide the context of history.  A good page-turner does for an early learner what dry recitations of dates and events cannot do– namely to leave them

The Prize is designed to encourage authors who are just getting started to write good, readable books about American history.  The winner of this year’s award will be announced at a reception in Washington on October 22, 2015.

Dr. Louise Mirrer, President and CEO of the New York Historical Society, is on the panel of judges for the Prize. She says textbooks and hand-outs are dull and kids simply don’t see the connection with their lives today. But an amazing thing happens after they leave school and get out into the world. Many of them develop a hankering for the past. And what do they read if they want to get absorbed in a novel? The answer, as often as not, is historical fiction. Just look at the current best-seller list: All the Light We Cannot See, The Nightingale, Four Nights with the Duke and Outlander.”

These historical novels work hard to be engaging, she says. The authors’ livelihoods depend on it—and so the curiosity of readers is aroused, their capacity to imagine the past is awakened, their store of information is enriched.

“Our question is: Why wait for kids to turn into grown-ups? One way that we could help get students hooked on history today is to put historical novels into their hands—ones that are both entertaining and faithful to the experience of the past.’

Movement seeks to engage students in history

Movement seeks to engage students in history

WASHINGTON, DC, Sep 9 – A new movement to engage America’s students in the study of history is underway. It’s led by a dedicated education advocate, David Bruce Smith, who admits that he and his team have a daunting task.

“Kids tend to do a lot of yawning in history class. Just look at the findings of the Department of Education’s National Assessment of Educational Progress [NAEP]. Their newest study revealed that fewer than half of our twelfth-grade students have a basic proficiency in U.S. history. Among fourth-graders, it’s less than a third,” said Smith, who is also an established author and publisher.

NAEP surveys have been administered since 1969 and have consistently revealed an “alarming” deficiency among students in their knowledge of U.S. history. Smith said that without an understanding of how and why America came to be and who were the important personalities who shaped the past, they won’t fully grasp what is required to become civically responsible citizens.

“That’s why I co-founded the Grateful American Book Prize. It is an effort to get kids curious about history and to give them the power they need to realize that the past is prologue to the future. While textbooks may provide the details, works of fiction and nonfiction based on fact provide the context of history. A good page-turner does for an early learner what dry recitations of dates and events cannot do— namely to leave them wanting for more information.”

The Prize is designed to encourage authors who are just getting started to write good, readable books about American history. The winner of this year’s award will be announced at a reception in Washington on October 22.

Dr. Louise Mirrer, President and CEO of the New York Historical Society, is on the panel of judges for the Prize. She says textbooks and hand-outs are dull and kids simply don’t see the connection with their lives today. But an amazing thing happens after they leave school and get out into the world. Many of them develop a hankering for the past. And what do they read if they want to get absorbed in a novel? The answer, as often as not, is historical fiction. Just look at the current best-seller list: All the Light We Cannot See, The Nightingale, Four Nights with the Duke and Outlander.”

These historical novels work hard to be engaging, she says. The authors’ livelihoods depend on it—and so the curiosity of readers is aroused, their capacity to imagine the past is awakened, their store of information is enriched.

“Our question is: Why wait for kids to turn into grown-ups? One way that we could help get students hooked on history today is to put historical novels into their hands—ones that are both entertaining and faithful to the experience of the past.”

David Bruce Smith Featured on iHeart Radio

iHeart Radio host Pat Rullo has a passion for history. The author, radio show host, and health care/insurance industry expert knows that you have to understand the past to understand the future.

Rullo asked David Bruce Smith, founder of the Grateful American™ Foundation to take her back to the beginning of the creation of his organization, and share what he has learned.

Listen to the podcast to learn:

  • What inspired you to launch the Grateful American™ Foundation?
  • What are your goals for the project?
  • Do you think textbooks, which can be less than riveting, are part of the problem?
  • Adults don’t seem to know much more than kids when tested on their knowledge of American history. Do you think this is really a problem, and if so, why?
  • What are some solutions to getting more kids and adults excited about knowing American history, and re-igniting our passion for the people who founded the country?
  • Though the Grateful American™ TV Show, you have interviewed dozens of the leaders of the nation’s biggest presidential homes—including Mt. Vernon, Monticello, Montpelier, Lincoln’s Cottage, as well Benjamin Franklin’s House in London. What are some of your favorite things about each home?
  • Who is your favorite president, and why?
  • You also have a deep appreciation for contributions made by the first ladies, and the women who shaped America’s early history. Why is that, and what are some of your favorites stories about these ladies? If you could accomplish one thing with the Grateful American™ Foundation, what would it be?

LISTEN >>

David Bruce Smith Featured on iHeart Radio

Let’s Talk Live: David Bruce Smith and White House Historian Bushong

Let’s Talk Live host Julie Wright interviewed historian William Bushong, the chief White House historian and VP of The White House Historical Association — and David Bruce Smith, founder of the Grateful American™ Foundation.

The White House Historical Association was founded in 1961 through the efforts of First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy. This private, non-profit organization has a big mission — to enhance the public’s understanding, appreciation, and enjoyment of the White House.

Education advocate makes the case for the importance of history lessons

It’s back to school for America’s children and their teachers who can look forward to a new wave of controversies as parents and politicians once again vie for the right to set classroom priorities, according to education advocate David Bruce Smith.

“No doubt the issues of the Common Core curriculum and STEM education [science, technology, engineering and mathematics] will be the focus of much debate. My concern is that all of the political positioning—and arguing–will obscure the greater goal: providing students with a well-rounded education and preparing them for their ultimate responsibilities as citizens,” he said.  “We need to give our children everything they will need to live productive, fulfilling lives and that means teaching them the new ways of life that come with the 21st Century. It also means providing them with a relevant perspective that will satisfy their needs and–the needs of the country.”

Smith said numerous surveys show that “perspective” is what has gone missing in the classroom as teachers have increasingly been forced to deemphasize history lessons in favor of more “practical” subjects.

“Schools have an obligation to offer their students an accurate, verifiable account of our country’s past.  To do otherwise is a disservice to them and to the future of the nation.

It is true that history repeats itself and that if we don’t learn the lessons of history we are bound to the mistakes of the past.  Right now our children are not learning how America achieved its successes; nor are they learning the slips that were made along the way.”

Smith, who is an author and publisher, is also the co-founder of the Grateful American Book Prize.  The Prize is a dedicated effort to help with the task ensuring that the teaching of history does not, itself, become history, he said.  It is intended to encourage authors and publishers to produce more historically accurate books of fiction and nonfiction that can restore enthusiasm about classroom history lessons.

The 2015 The National Assessment of Educational Progress [NAEP] assessment, which has earned the nickname, the Nation’s Report Card, recently tested approximately 29,000 eighth graders.  The results: only 18 percent of the children were proficient in history.

“Computers and the Internet are exciting and give our children a productive way to use their nimble fingers.  But enlightening them about the future potential of technology should not come at the cost of teaching them the lessons of history.  History class can be boring but it doesn’t have to be.  Give kids a good, factually engrossing read about the events and personalities that got the country this far and they get it—and they get an informed look into the future.”

Education advocate makes the case for the importance of history lessons